Archive for: Cables used in courts

WikiLeaks documents used in Courts: The case of the Chagos Islands (Short Update)

WikiLeaks documents used in Courts: The case of the Chagos Islands (Short Update)

This post is an update of previous posts about the long-standing legal fight of Chagossians over their exile from the Chagos Islands and the creation of a marine park on their lands. See our previous posts: WikiLeaks documents used in Courts: The case of Chagossian Islanders and Wikileaks Documents used in Courts: The case of Chagos islands and the Inviolability of Diplomatic Documents. On 1 April 2014, an article in Herald...

 
 

WL Cables and their use in Courts: The case of the solar plant in Spain

In our series “Cables used in Courts” there are also examples where the Court does not accept the Embassy Cables as pieces of evidence. That is what happened recently in Spain, with the case of a public contract granted to a Californian corporation to build a solar plant. We  comment here on an article published in “El Pais” on July 6, 2013.   The background: In 2010 the Spanish State...

 
 

WikiLeaks documents used in courts: The case of Chagos Islands and the inviolability of diplomatic documents

WikiLeaks documents used in courts: The case of Chagos Islands and the inviolability of diplomatic documents

As we explained in the updates of our article about Chagossian Islands issues, ( http://wikileaks-press.org/wikileaks-documents-used-in-courts-the-case-of-chagos-islanders/) ,    a judgement by the High England and Wales  Administrative Court  In April 18, 2013 has decided that classified American Embassy Cables obtained by WikiLeaks cannot be used as evidence in English and Welsh courts because they breach “diplomatic privilege“. In their ruling, the judges  said that the Diplomatic Privileges Act of 1964, which...

 
 

WikiLeaks Cables Used in Courts: The Case of the Slaughtered in Catamarca

In 2004, members of Human Rights groups went to the Judiciary to sue the Military responsible for the massacre, arguing that killing an enemy after he has surrendered, without trial, is considered as illegal by International Law and can be qualified as a war crime according to the Geneva Convention. Two cables, published by WikiLeaks recently as part of the “Kissinger Cables” will be used during the trial and included in the case evidence.

 
 

WikiLeaks documents used in courts: The case of the Iranian bank

Another case in our series of articles about WikiLeaks documents used in a trial. Published in UK  Human Right Blogs on January 30, 2013 by David Hart,  under the title: EU Court annuls EU freezing orders on Iranian bank – and Wikileaks again Bank Mellat v Council of the European Union (supported by EU Commission), EU General Court, 29 January 2013 (read judgment) In October 2009, Bank Mellat, an Iranian bank, was...

 
 

WikiLeaks documents used in courts: The case of diamond mining in Zimbabwe

By  SW Radio Africa  – Alex Bell -  28 January 2013. In this case, the documents were not exactly used in courts as a proof in a lawsuit, but were the starting point of a defamation trial.   Original Title: African Consolidated Resources a ‘sacrificial lamb’ after losing WikiLeaks case. The head of a former Chiadzwa based mining company, who was sued over information contained in a previously confidential diplomatic...